The Environmental Journal of Southern Appalachia

Quaff a recycled brew and check your waste line this weekend

Written by

IMG 3189The city of Knoxville has started a pilot composting project for residents and restaurants. Come meet cool people and learn more about limiting food waste and sip some beers April 9 at Crafty Bastard Brewery. City of Knoxville 

Learn how to reduce food waste Saturday at Crafty Bastard Brewery 

Paige Travis is a public information specialist for the city of Knoxville.

KNOXVILLE — The Waste and Resources Management Office invites the public to learn how to reduce food waste and drink a special brew Saturday, April 9 at the culmination of Tennessee Food Waste Awareness Week.

“The city of Knoxville is committed to reducing the amount of food waste that we put into our landfill,” said Waste and Resources Manager Patience Melnik, whose department recently launched the Knoxville Compost Pilot Project.

Hellbender Press previously reported on efforts to reduce food waste at the University of Tennessee.

“Working together with residents and restaurants, we can divert more food scraps from the landfill into backyard and larger-scale composting endeavors. By doing this, we reduce the amount of methane created in landfills and reduce our city’s contribution to climate change,” Melnik said.

Knoxville residents are invited to learn more about food waste at the Bread-to-Tap Food Waste Awareness event from 12-4 p.m. Saturday at Crafty Bastard Brewery, 6 Emory Place.

The family-friendly event includes a food drive for Ladies of Charity, composting workshops, a food-waste dropoff, and resources to help residents reduce their food waste contributions to the landfill.

Event attendees who donate at least five qualifying items to Ladies of Charity will receive $2 off a specialty craft beer Crafty has brewed with recovered bread donated by Paysan Bread.

Dr. Chad Hellwinckel will teach two backyard composting workshops at noon and 1 p.m.  The cost is $20 and workshop participants get to take home a city tumbler composter.

Representatives from the following organizations will be on hand to share resources and answer questions: Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation; Knox Green Drinks; Real Good Kitchen; Green Heron; Keep Knoxville Beautiful; and Beardsley Farm.

Tennessee Food Waste Awareness Week brings together food-waste experts to highlight the many issues surrounding food waste and to inspire people to take action to reduce food waste and increase food recovery and diversion in Tennessee.

Get more information about the Knoxville Compost Pilot Program from Knoxville Waste and Resource Management services

Rate this item
(1 Vote)

Related items

  • That ain’t country: Activists protest proposed downtown tree removal in Knoxville

    KNOXVILLE — People assembled at 6 p.m. Aug. 19 to speak for the trees threatened by development of an art installment at the half-acre Cradle of Country Music Park at the corner of Gay Street and Summit Hill Drive downtown.

    The Harvey Broome Chapter of the Sierra Club organized the protest against the removal of five mature oak trees to make way for the sculpture and its base, which was originally commissioned to a New York City artist in 2018 and will cost the city $600,000, according to reporting from Compass. The online news outlet also reported Friday that Councilwoman Seema Singh has requested a pause in the project to determine whether there are alternatives to removing the trees.

  • Smokies rangers kill bear after it hurts Elkmont campers while seeking food

    6-minute video about what to do if you see a black bear

    Smokies officials say euthanized bear was overweight and seeking human food

    GATLINBURG — Great Smoky Mountains National Park wildlife biologists and park rangers responded to Elkmont Campground on Sunday (June 12) after a peculiarly large black bear injured a toddler and her mother sleeping in a tent.

    Wildlife biologists captured the responsible bear, and it was euthanized Monday, June 13, according to a news release from the park service.

    “The bear weighed approximately 350 pounds, which is not standard for this time of year, suggesting the bear had previous and likely consistent access to non-natural food sources,” said Lisa McInnis, resource management chief.

  • Knoxville to citizens: ’Post up!
    in News

    City announces plan to encourage composting by residents and businesses

    KNOXVILLE — What do you do with your meatless leftover food scraps?

    Sometimes here at Hellbender Press global headquarters in South Knox we throw them in the yard for winter critters; occasionally sneak some to the dogs; bury them in the vegetable garden; or sometimes slip them into the relatively unused backyard composter by the cat graves way in the back. 

    It seems such a waste to throw it away or even produce it in the first place, and centralized landfill food scraps spew methane and linger for years. It’s a big gnarly stewpot. 

  • CTV Community Engagement Calendar
    Community Television of Knoxville (CTV)

    CTV’s Community Engagement Calendar provides information about both, date-specific events and the regular programs & services provided by nonprofit organizations.

    Many people still think it is necessary to have a TV cable connection to watch community TV programs. But that’s old history.

    One does not even need to be in the City of Knoxville or anywhere near it, nor have a TV set anymore.

  • Hard Knox Wire: Renowned white supremacist killed by accidental headshot in South Knox
    in News

    2E21131C-9E9C-405B-A93B-2D4E099C04FF.png

    Well-known Knoxville white supremacist and ‘cultured thug’ dies of apparent accidental gunshot wound to head 

    Originally published by Hard Knox Wire

    A Knoxville man who earned widespread notoriety as a leader in the violent white nationalist movement died last week after he was shot in the head in South Knox County.

    Craig Spaulding, age 33, was transported to the hospital from a residence near Maryville Pike about 8:14 p.m. Thursday, according to a report from the Knox County Sheriff’s Office.
     
    Spaulding was suffering from what appeared to be an accidental gunshot wound to the head fired from a Beretta 950 handgun, the report indicates. He later died at the University of Tennessee Medical Center and the investigation continues.
     
    Other than the fact that Spaulding left behind a wife and three children, few details of his private life are known. He was something of a celebrity in far-Right political circles and was being monitored by civil rights groups such as the Southern Poverty Law Center.
     
    Spaulding was a self-described white nationalist, which means he was a member of a group of militant white men and women who espouse white supremacy and advocate enforced racial segregation.
     
    Spaulding’s first brush with notoriety came in 2015 when he allegedly shot and killed a neighbor’s dog and then claimed he was protecting his pet rabbits, according to contemporary news reports.
     
    Spaulding’s involvement in various hate groups has been extensively documented by the SPLC and Idavox, a website that publishes information about right wing organizations and their members.
     
    His last known group affiliation was with NSC-131 (the “NSC” stands for “Nationalist Social Club” while “131” is an alphanumeric code word for “anti-communist action”), a street gang that frequently travels to left-wing rallies both in and out of East Tennessee to cause mayhem in the camps of their political opponents.
     
    Spaulding would often show up as a counter protester at gay pride and anti-racist events and demonstrations. He would yell anti-gay and racist insults, sometimes using violent rhetoric that alarmed activists and led to him being escorted away from several events by police.

    Spaulding was among eight white supremacists who were arrested in the summer of 2020 during a Black Lives Matter protest in Rogersville.
     
    In a statement published on white supremacist Telegram channels, NSC-New England and Radio Free Indiana, Craig was praised in a post attributed to Matt Parrott as a man who “lived a passionate life dedicated to his Christian faith, his beautiful family, and his Appalachian folk.”
     
    Parrot went on to say that Spaulding “embodied the ideal of the ‘cultured thug’ more than any man I’ve known; philosophically, metapolitically, and strategically—with heart.”
     
    Social media commentators on the opposite side of the political spectrum had different things to say about him.
     
    “Craig has been an openly violent neo-Nazi for years and has consistently attempted to terrorize communities around Appalachia and the Mid-west,” said Garfield But Antifascist, a Twitter user with almost 6,600 followers.
     
    “We apologize to all Craig’s non-Nazi family members, but for the sake of the wider community, his loss will not be mourned.”
     
    Local activists have expressed concerns that Spaulding’s death may prompt an influx of white nationalists into the Knoxville area for his funeral, details of which haven’t been made public.
     
    They are concerned NSC-131 members may seek out violent confrontations with minority groups or deface buildings, vehicles and statues in the the downtown area with racist graffiti, stickers and fliers.
     

    Follow the latest Knoxville crime and justice news from Hard Knox Wire.

     
    Jennifer Stambaugh can be reached at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
  • Health officials: Knoxville air quality on sustained upswing
    WBIR: Knoxville air quality data indicates sustained improvements

    The Knox County Health Department reports that fine particles declined by half between 2007 and 2018. Ozone levels also remained below national standards during that period. The combined pollution reductions — achieved through tighter emissions standards on power plants and vehicles — have resulted in the cleanest air in Knox County since 1999, according to the Health Department.

    Here’s a link to the full 2019 Knox County Community Health Assessment.

  • Knoxville Neighborhood Conference

    All the virtual content remains accessible

    through Apr 3

    The City of Knoxville's virtual 2021 Neighborhood Conference
    Yearly neighborhood-focused event to connect neighborhoods & strengthen communities
    Brought to you by the City of Knoxville's Office of Neighborhood Empowerment, in collaboration with numerous city and county departments

    Engage with our community through the Virtual Convention Center Platform — FREE but registration is required

    Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, this year’s conference will be virtual but will include all of the aspects of our in-person conference from the comfort of your own home. You will be able to attend workshops, hear remarks from Mayor Kincannon, visit information booths and more.

    Conference details and registration

    Open to everyone—neighborhood leaders, members and participants of neighborhood organizations and any city resident interested in the quality of life in Knoxville’s neighborhoods.

  • Choose your own adventure in Knoxville’s Urban Wilderness
    in News

    frsunflowersNot all of the Knoxville Urban Wilderness is true wilderness, of course. This monoculture field of sunflowers planted at the Forks of the River Wildlife Management Area does, however, attract lots of wildlife.  Courtesy Visit Knoxville

    Spring study to quantify visitation, economic impact

    Physically, the Urban Wilderness is 1,000 acres of natural and recreational land in South Knoxville. Visitors can enjoy hiking across Civil War battlefields, running on naturally surfaced trails, swimming in old quarries, and mountain biking on expertly designed tracks. But the Urban Wilderness is much more than a place. 

    “It’s something special for Knoxville and defines us as a recreational community,” said city Deputy Chief of Economic and Community Development Rebekah Jane Justice. She was named the city’s first Urban Wilderness Coordinator in July 2017, and is still the city’s go-to expert on this ambitious, ongoing land-preservation and recreational project. “It’s about so many things, including building our local economy in a unique way.” 

    The Urban Wilderness is, many will say, a boon to Knoxville’s economy, both in increasing tourism and for the businesses around it, including coffee shops, breweries, and restaurants. But hard numbers about its impact are still being developed. In 2015, University of Tennessee economics professor Charles Sims wrote a white paper projecting that if the Urban Wilderness grew to a national destination, it could have an economic impact of more than $29 million annually. 

    Now that the Urban Wilderness is more established, actual numbers about usage are more easily captured than when Sims authored his paper. Matthew Kellogg of the Appalachian Mountain Bike Club said that his club received an equipment grant from the International Mountain Bicycling Association for trail-counter devices to quantify how many people use the trails — and where and when. Currently Kellogg’s group is calibrating 11 newly placed trail counters in the Urban Wilderness. By spring, the group hopes to be collecting reliable data. 

    Among the things this data will be used for is a multi-year study by University of Tennessee kinesiology and recreation professor Eugene Fitzhugh, a frequent lecturer about urban trails their impact on a community’s physical activity.