The Environmental Journal of Southern Appalachia

Is TVA providing the best prices for energy consumers? Congress wants to know.

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kingstonThe Tennessee Valley Authority's fossil plant at Kingston. TVA
 

Southern Alliance for Clean Energy: TVA is not coming clean in Congressional inquiries

KNOXVILLE — On Jan. 13, the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce sent a letter to the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) requesting information regarding business practices that appear inconsistent with TVA’s statutory requirement to provide low-cost power to residents of the Tennessee Valley.
TVA’s response to the committee’s 16 questions dodges some of the committee members’ key concerns and provides misleading information on several issues, including:
 
  • Insufficient energy efficiency plans to address high electricity bills and reduce reliance on fossil fuel
  • Suppression of distributed solar
  • Unclear future renewable plans and decarbonization goal
  • Misuse of ratepayer funds
 
The House Energy and Commerce Committee members and staff will be reviewing TVA’s response. If the response is deemed inadequate, the committee members may issue another oversight letter or schedule an oversight hearing. 
 
The latest SACE blog post outlines where TVA has fallen short in its response to the committee and its customers.
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