The Environmental Journal of Southern Appalachia

Fly away on an adventure at Avian Discovery Days

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Chattanooga Audubon Society EC0980DD 5056 B365 AB0AEAA199A63197 ec0980515056b36 ec09813f 5056 b365 abfce9f6a01f72a3Chattanooga Audubon Society

CHATTANOOGA Birds of a feather are called to flock together this week at Chattanooga Audubon Society’s Avian Discovery Days April 5-7. This is the third year of this event at the Audubon Acres sanctuary, and reservations are required.

Call (423) 892-1499 or check out Avian Discovery Days for more information.

Participants will learn about birds during four activities, including bird walks specifically designed to teach identification skills. They will also learn how birds survive migration in the Great Migration Challenge game.

Rangers from Tennessee State Parks will present educational programs with live birds of prey.

Perhaps the most unique learning experience at this event will be a visit to the C.E. Blevins Avian Jewels exhibit, the world’s most extensive collection of bird egg replicas. C.E. Blevins was a minister and artist who wanted people to be able to learn about bird eggs without disturbing nests and made thousands of bird egg replicas during his lifetime. 

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