The Environmental Journal of Southern Appalachia

Advance Knox — Ideas Week: Knox County invites public participation to guide land use and transportation decisions for years to come

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Knox County offers opportunities for public participation in the overhaul of planning guidelinesKnox County offers opportunities for public participation in the overhaul of planning guidelines  Knoxville-Knox County Planning

Framework for growth in Knox County

Advance Knox is a comprehensive planning process initiated by Knox County Mayor Glenn Jacobs “to guide growth, land use, transportation, economic prosperity, and quality of life.”

The process is intended to result in a new Knox County general plan and subsequently shape revisions of the sector plans. Together, that set of major plans establishes criteria for further plans by Knoxville-Knox County Planning, such as local area and annual plans, as well as timing and implementation specifics for the Knox County portions of the Regional Transportation Planning Organization’s Long Range Regional Mobility Plan.

At each 90-minute Ideas Week event, you’ll learn about the process through idea generation and map-based activities. It’s a chance to share what’s important to you.

— Sunday, March 27 – 1:30 p.m. at Gibbs Middle School

— Monday, March 28 – 5:30 p.m. at Hardin Valley Middle School or Carter High School

— Tuesday, March 29 – 5:30 p.m. at West High School or Northshore Elementary School

— Wednesday, March 30 – 5:30 p.m. at Powell High School or South Doyle Middle School

Knoxville-Knox County General Plan 2033, adopted in 2003, established the framework for the current sector plans and was amended with the Knoxville-Knox County Park, Recreation and Greenways Plan in 2010.

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