The Environmental Journal of Southern Appalachia

Get involved: Protestors lock arms to demand TVA swear off fossil fuels for good

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3D2A2F6C B919 4295 B244 36D48A4BF9BD 1 105 cProtestors chant and wave signs urging TVA to commit to a fossil fuel-free future during a protest in downtown Knoxville this summer. Courtesy Amy Rawe/Southern Alliance for Clean Energy

Activists will demand TVA allow public comments during a protest planned for Wednesday morning outside TVA HQ in downtown Knoxville

Knoxville clean-air activists plan another protest  Wednesday outside of Tennessee Valley Authority headquarters to demand a return to public-comment periods and a commitment the huge utility won’t rely on fossil-fuel energy sources in the future.

“Public input is critical right now, while TVA is considering building new, large fossil gas power plants and pipelines, even though they would be contrary to our need to cut greenhouse gas emissions in half by 2030,” said protest organizer Brady Watson of Southern Alliance for Clean EnergyStatewide Organizing for Community Empowerment is also coordinating the protest.

“TVA’s current leadership is locking us out of decisions impacting our future,” Watson said, “so we’re locking arms outside of TVA towers in downtown Knoxville during their Board meeting” on Wednesday November 10 at 10 AM ET to demand TVA:

  • Reimplement public listening sessions virtually until it is safe to do so in person.
  • Take the climate crisis seriously by investing in clean energy and not new fossil gas. 

The protest will be streamed live on the event’s Facebook page

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